Reducing On-The-Job Stress Improves The Classroom Experience

The teacher's self-care is an impor tant tool for providing a better classroom experience for students. (NAPS)

(NAPSI)—As with any helping profession, teaching can be a stressful job—but teachers say the rewards are worth it.

Why They Gladly Teach

According to a University of Phoenix survey, K−12 teachers most enjoy the interaction with children—with 68 percent citing seeing the growth of students and 57 percent citing working with children in general as their favorite part of the job.

How to Make Teaching Better

“Those who go into the teaching profession tend to have a passion for it. It’s hard work and sometimes thankless. Self-care is important,” said Pamela Roggeman, Ed.D., academic dean for the College of Education at University of Phoenix. She offers these tips:

1. Don’t be afraid to ask for help. Whether from the school principal, classroom parents or your colleagues, a support system is important.

2. Request donations for the classroom to relieve personal financial burden. Teachers often dig into their own pockets to pay for classroom supplies. Ask parents for assistance in collecting needed items.

3. Do small things every day to take care of yourself. Have snacks on hand for those days when your lunch break is interrupted. Look into short meditations or breathing exercises for times when stress levels are higher.

4. Take time to recharge. Career burnout can happen. Take a day off or a short break when you can and focus on something you enjoy.

5. Make your classroom a place where everyone can refocus. Remember that your state of mind will guide your students. Try things students can benefit from, too, such as mindful moments throughout the day or even aromatherapy.

What Else You Can Do

Staying up to date on current trends can also help reduce on-the-job stress. According to the survey, about half of the people who’ve been teaching for at least five years say there are more leadership role opportunities than in the past, but only 16 percent of all teachers gave themselves an “A” when it comes to educational technology, leaving room for growth in this area for many.

Many of those who feel that teaching may be their calling or are looking to advance their career in education may care for information about University of Phoenix teacher preparation programs, continuing teacher education and professional development programs. They’re available on the University of Phoenix website at www.phoenix.edu/education.

Learn More

The University of Phoenix College of Education has been educating teachers and school administrators for more than 30 years. It provides bachelor’s and master’s degree programs for individuals who want to become teachers or current educators and administrators seeking advanced degrees to strengthen their professional knowledge. With education programs available throughout most of the U.S., it has a distinct grasp of the national education picture and priorities for teacher preparation. It’s just one way University of Phoenix helps working adults. To learn about all the programs offered through the College of Education, visit www.phoenix.edu/education.

clicktotweet ““Those who go into the teaching profession tend to have a passion for it. It’s hard work and sometimes thankless. Self-care is important,” said Pamela Roggeman, Ed.D., academic dean for the College of Education at University of Phoenix. http://bit.ly/2JVNAVs

On the Net:North American Precis Syndicate, Inc.(NAPSI)

(0) comments

Welcome to the discussion.

Keep it Clean. Please avoid obscene, vulgar, lewd, racist or sexually-oriented language.
PLEASE TURN OFF YOUR CAPS LOCK.
Don't Threaten. Threats of harming another person will not be tolerated.
Be Truthful. Don't knowingly lie about anyone or anything.
Be Nice. No racism, sexism or any sort of -ism that is degrading to another person.
Be Proactive. Use the 'Report' link on each comment to let us know of abusive posts.
Share with Us. We'd love to hear eyewitness accounts, the history behind an article.